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    joshbyard:

Human Heart-Muscle Cells, Grown From Stem Cells, Successfully Implanted in Damaged Guinea Pig Heart

“What we have done is prove that these cells do what working heart muscles do, which is beat in sync with the rest of the heart,” says Chuck Murry, a cardiovascular biologist at the University of Washington in Seattle, who co-led the research.
Cardiomyocytes derived from human embryonic stem (ES) cells typically beat fewer than 150 times a minute. External electrical stimulation can increase that rate, but only up to about 240 beats per minute, says Michael LaFlamme, a cardiovascular biologist at the University of Washington and the other co-leader on the project.
Rats and mice have heart rates of around 400 and 600 beats per minute, respectively. However, guinea pigs have a heart rate of 200–250 beats per minute, near the limit for human cardiomyocytes.
From the first experiment with the sensor in guinea pigs, it was obvious that the transplanted cells were beating in time with the rest of the heart, says LaFlamme. When he looked into the chest cavity, the heart “was flashing back at us”, he says.

(via Guinea pig hearts beat with human cells | KurzweilAI)

    joshbyard:

    Human Heart-Muscle Cells, Grown From Stem Cells, Successfully Implanted in Damaged Guinea Pig Heart

    “What we have done is prove that these cells do what working heart muscles do, which is beat in sync with the rest of the heart,” says Chuck Murry, a cardiovascular biologist at the University of Washington in Seattle, who co-led the research.

    Cardiomyocytes derived from human embryonic stem (ES) cells typically beat fewer than 150 times a minute. External electrical stimulation can increase that rate, but only up to about 240 beats per minute, says Michael LaFlamme, a cardiovascular biologist at the University of Washington and the other co-leader on the project.

    Rats and mice have heart rates of around 400 and 600 beats per minute, respectively. However, guinea pigs have a heart rate of 200–250 beats per minute, near the limit for human cardiomyocytes.

    From the first experiment with the sensor in guinea pigs, it was obvious that the transplanted cells were beating in time with the rest of the heart, says LaFlamme. When he looked into the chest cavity, the heart “was flashing back at us”, he says.

    (via Guinea pig hearts beat with human cells | KurzweilAI)

    (via futurescope)

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    futurescope:

Silver nanowire conductors could mean better stretchable electronics
via gizmag:

Earlier this year, a team led by North Carolina State University’s Dr. Yong Zhu reported success in creating elastic conductors made from carbon nanotubes. Such conductors could be used in stretchable electronics, which could in turn find use in things like bendable displays, smart fabrics, or even touch-sensitive robot skin. Now, he has made some more elastic conductors, but this time using silver nanowires – according to Zhu, they offer some big advantages over carbon nanotubes. […]

[read more][Photo Credit: Dr. Yong Zhu]

    futurescope:

    Silver nanowire conductors could mean better stretchable electronics

    via gizmag:

    Earlier this year, a team led by North Carolina State University’s Dr. Yong Zhu reported success in creating elastic conductors made from carbon nanotubes. Such conductors could be used in stretchable electronics, which could in turn find use in things like bendable displayssmart fabrics, or even touch-sensitive robot skin. Now, he has made some more elastic conductors, but this time using silver nanowires – according to Zhu, they offer some big advantages over carbon nanotubes. […]

    [read more][Photo Credit: Dr. Yong Zhu]

    (via futurescope)

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    (Source: 0cean-depths, via opiyate)

  4. text
    inspirinquotes:

A story about overcoming adversity:
Wilma Rudolph was born prematurely in 1940 to a railroad porter and a maid. She was only 4 1/2 lbs and the 20th of 22 children. As an African American female living in poverty she already had a tough lot in life, and to make matters worse she became crippled because of polio at 4 years old. Unable to walk, she wore leg braces and her siblings took turns massaging her legs. Her mother drove her 90 miles weekly to therapy, but doctors told her not to bother. They said Wilma would never walk again. In the meantime she fought whooping cough, measles and chicken pox, however Wilma was determined to lead a “normal” life. With this willpower, by the time she was 8 she learned to walk with a brace. When she was 9 she mastered walking using only a high-topped shoe that supported her foot. At 11 she was able to play basketball without the shoe. When she got older she played basketball and ran track in school.
A coach recognized Wilma’s talent and encouraged her to succeed. At 16 she won a bronze medal in the Olympics for a relay. By the time she was 20 she became “the fastest woman in the world” and the first American woman to win three gold medals in one Olympics! She beat records for the 100 and 200 meter races. Wilma Rudolph represented her country proudly and humbly and paved the way for African-American athletes who came later.
Later in her life she established the Wilma Rudolph Foundation, a non-profit community-based sports program. She said this was her proudest accomplishment.
If Wilma’s story tells us anything, it’s that the quality of resilience is key to success. Wilma never let her circumstances dictate what she could or could not do. Even when she was told over and over to give up, she never gave in.
There’s no time for excuses or complaining. Go chase after your dreams and never give up. Become unstoppable!

    inspirinquotes:

    A story about overcoming adversity:

    Wilma Rudolph was born prematurely in 1940 to a railroad porter and a maid. She was only 4 1/2 lbs and the 20th of 22 children. As an African American female living in poverty she already had a tough lot in life, and to make matters worse she became crippled because of polio at 4 years old. Unable to walk, she wore leg braces and her siblings took turns massaging her legs. Her mother drove her 90 miles weekly to therapy, but doctors told her not to bother. They said Wilma would never walk again. In the meantime she fought whooping cough, measles and chicken pox, however Wilma was determined to lead a “normal” life. With this willpower, by the time she was 8 she learned to walk with a brace. When she was 9 she mastered walking using only a high-topped shoe that supported her foot. At 11 she was able to play basketball without the shoe. When she got older she played basketball and ran track in school.

    A coach recognized Wilma’s talent and encouraged her to succeed. At 16 she won a bronze medal in the Olympics for a relay. By the time she was 20 she became “the fastest woman in the world” and the first American woman to win three gold medals in one Olympics! She beat records for the 100 and 200 meter races. Wilma Rudolph represented her country proudly and humbly and paved the way for African-American athletes who came later.

    Later in her life she established the Wilma Rudolph Foundation, a non-profit community-based sports program. She said this was her proudest accomplishment.

    If Wilma’s story tells us anything, it’s that the quality of resilience is key to success. Wilma never let her circumstances dictate what she could or could not do. Even when she was told over and over to give up, she never gave in.

    There’s no time for excuses or complaining. Go chase after your dreams and never give up. Become unstoppable!

    (via mrlibidinous)

  5. text
    searchengineland:

Google Grows Revenues 24% From Last Year, Plans New Class Of Stock
Google’s revenues rose to $10.65 billion in the first quarter of 2012, resulting in net income of $2.89 billion, or $8.75 per share, the company announced after market close today. The revenue number represents a 24% increase over the year-ago period. Additionally, the board of directors proposed the creation of a new class of non-voting shares — to be distributed as a dividend to all current shareholders — effectively resulting in an two for one stock split.
“We had a very strong quarter,” said CEO Larry Page on a conference call with press and analysts, “Since becoming CEO again, I have pushed hard to focus on the big bets.”
Page described the creation of a new class of stock as enabling the founders to keep corporate decision-making amongst a small group, allowing the company to continue to take a longer-term view on the business. Though Page and Sergey Brin, in a 2012 founders’ letter, say they know some won’t be happy about the decision, “…after careful consideration with our board of directors, we have decided that maintaining this founder-led approach is in the best interests of Google, our shareholders and our users. Having the flexibility to use stock without diluting our structure will help ensure we are set up for success for decades to come.”
The decision begs speculation about what Google may be planning to do with its stock — acquisitions, perhaps? — that it wants to do without granting voting rights. But, in the letter, the founders address this, saying: “we don’t have an unusually big acquisition planned, in case you were wondering.”

    searchengineland:

    Google Grows Revenues 24% From Last Year, Plans New Class Of Stock

    Google’s revenues rose to $10.65 billion in the first quarter of 2012, resulting in net income of $2.89 billion, or $8.75 per share, the company announced after market close today. The revenue number represents a 24% increase over the year-ago period. Additionally, the board of directors proposed the creation of a new class of non-voting shares — to be distributed as a dividend to all current shareholders — effectively resulting in an two for one stock split.

    “We had a very strong quarter,” said CEO Larry Page on a conference call with press and analysts, “Since becoming CEO again, I have pushed hard to focus on the big bets.”

    Page described the creation of a new class of stock as enabling the founders to keep corporate decision-making amongst a small group, allowing the company to continue to take a longer-term view on the business. Though Page and Sergey Brin, in a 2012 founders’ letter, say they know some won’t be happy about the decision, “…after careful consideration with our board of directors, we have decided that maintaining this founder-led approach is in the best interests of Google, our shareholders and our users. Having the flexibility to use stock without diluting our structure will help ensure we are set up for success for decades to come.”

    The decision begs speculation about what Google may be planning to do with its stock — acquisitions, perhaps? — that it wants to do without granting voting rights. But, in the letter, the founders address this, saying: “we don’t have an unusually big acquisition planned, in case you were wondering.”

    (via emergentfutures)

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    fastcompany:

    How To Find Millions Of Dollars In Garbage

    Luis Duarte’s recycling company is moving into a bleak market: Virtually no one recycles in Mexico. But that also means opportunity. There’s a lot of cash to be made mining raw materials from other people’s waste.

    Read on->

  7. text
    treehugger:

What’s the Future of Wind Power? Check out these 9 cool wind power innovations
via The Future of Wind Power: 9 Cool Innovations

    treehugger:

    What’s the Future of Wind Power? Check out these 9 cool wind power innovations

    via The Future of Wind Power: 9 Cool Innovations

  8. letslook4treasure:

    theatlantic:

    Confirmed: The Internet Does Not Solve Global Inequality

    If you live in a rich country, the Internet has probably changed the way you consume (and produce) information. But when you look at global-scale knowledge production, things are as they ever were: the Anglophone world dominates with the United States doing the lion’s share of academic and user-generated publishing.

    Those are the messages of the Oxford Internet Institute’s new e-book, Geographies of the World’s Knowledge, from which the above graphics were drawn. The book’s authors, Corinne Flick of the Convoco Foundation and the Institute’s Mark Graham and Viktor Mayer-Schonberger, reluctantly conclude that the Internet has not delivered on the hopes that it would make knowledge “more accessible.”

    “Many commentators speculated that [the Internet] would allow people outside of industrialised nations to gain access to all networked and codified knowledge, thus mitigating the traditionally concentrated nature of information production and consumption,” they write. “These early expectations remain largely unrealised.” 

    We’re not only talking about publishing in academic journals or Wikipedia. The researchers also sampled user-generated content on Google and found that rich countries, especially the United States, dominate the production of user content.

    The fact of the matter is that people without money can’t afford to get the education necessary to publish in academic journals, Internet-enabled or not. The other fact of the matter is that the vast majority of people in very poor countries don’t spend their time producing content for free. Hope as we might, the Internet isn’t a magic wand that makes the world more equal. 

    Read more. [Image: Oxford Internet Institute]

    (via climate-changing)

  9. text
    
THE FUTURE OF MOBILE Alex Cocotas and Henry Blodget, businessinsider.com
Yes­ter­day, we host­ed our IGNI­TION WEST: Future of Mobile con­fer­ence in San Fran­cis­co.
To kick off the con­fer­ence, our BI Intel­li­gence team—Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry, Alex Coco­tas, and I—put togeth­er a deck on the cur­rent…

    THE FUTURE OF MOBILE
    Alex Cocotas and Henry Blodget, businessinsider.com

    Yes­ter­day, we host­ed our IGNI­TION WEST: Future of Mobile con­fer­ence in San Fran­cis­co.

    To kick off the con­fer­ence, our BI Intel­li­gence team—Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry, Alex Coco­tas, and I—put togeth­er a deck on the cur­rent…

    (Source: futuramb, via emergentfutures)

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    nasdaq:

    Google wants to see more “moon-shot” thinking, and the search giant is going to lend a hand. Mashable reports that the company is launching something called Solve for X, a TED-like series of gatherings meant to foster thought-leader brainstorming. The homepage describes Solve for X as “a place where the curious can go to hear and discuss radical technology ideas for solving global problems,” and the introductory video (above) certainly piques our curiosity.

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